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Higher levels of diet-derived antioxidants don’t protect against heart disease

Journal
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Reuters Health - 04/01/2021 - Dietary antioxidants offer no protection against the development of coronary heart disease (CHD), suggesting supplements may not do so either, according to a new Mendelian-randomization study. The findings do not support a beneficial role of high dietary-derived vitamins E or C, beta-carotene, lycopene or retinol on CHD risk in the general population, the researchers say in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "Therefore, it is unlikely that taking antioxidants to increase blood antioxidants levels will have a clinical benefit for the prevention of primary CHD," they conclude. There is conflicting evidence on the role of diet-derived antioxidants (vitamins E and C and carotenoids) in primary CHD prevention, Dr. Raymond Noordam and colleagues from Leiden University, in the Netherlands, note in their paper. Observational studies have identified associations between higher levels of diet-derived antioxidants and...


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