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Do we underestimate the effect of air pollution on lung cancer incidence?

Presented By
Dr Renelle Myers, University of British Columbia, Canada
Conference
WCLC 2022
Doi
https://doi.org/10.55788/9102f0d1
Cumulative exposure to ambient air pollutants should be included in the assessment of individual lung cancer risk, according to the authors of a Canadian study evaluating the association between outdoor air pollution and lung cancer in non-smoking women. However, 20-year exposure data may not be enough to capture the true effects of air pollution [1]. “Non-smoking women have a higher risk of lung cancer than non-smoking men,” stated Dr Renelle Myers (University of British Columbia, Canada). “Also, evidence indicates that air pollution is a major cause of lung cancer in non-smoking individuals [2].” The current study aimed to compare the cumulative 3-year versus 20-year exposure to particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) in newly diagnosed women with lung cancer who had never smoked. Data from a detailed residential history questionnaire was uploaded into a geographic information system that quantified PM2.5 with a high-spatial resolution global exposure model. ...


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